Home Ancient Greek Philip of Macedon GC00204
     Previous Coin     Next Coin

Macedonian Kingdom, Philip II; 336-359 BC
Silver tetradrachm
Born in Pella, Philip was the youngest son of the king Amyntas III and Eurydice II. In his youth, (c. 368–365 BC) Philip was held as a hostage in Thebes, which was the leading city of Greece during the Theban hegemony. While a captive there, Philip received a military and diplomatic education from Epaminondas, the leader of Thebes. Born in Pella, Philip was the youngest son of the king Amyntas III and Eurydice II. In 364 BC, Philip returned to Macedon and ascended to the throne in 359 BC. Philip's military skills and expansionist vision of Macedonian greatness brought him early success, and with the introduction of the sarissa-wielding phalanx infantry, Greece lay at Philip’s feet. After subduing many of the northern city-states, Philip planned to invade Sparta. He sent them a message: "You are advised to submit without further delay, for if I bring my army into your land, I will destroy your farms, slay your people, and raze your city." Sparta’s now-famous laconic reply was: “If.” Both Philip and Alexander left Sparta alone. After the Battle of Chaeronea in 338 BC, Philip solidified his grasp on Greece and turned toward Persia, but he was murdered in 336 BC while the invasion was in its early stages. His son Alexander would continue where his father left off, becoming the greatest conqueror of the time. The obverse shows the laureate head of Zeus. The reverse features a youth riding a horse with the ensciption ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟΥ along the outside.
Mint: Pella
Provenance: Private acquisition *

Google Location Map